Lyman Ricot Bounous

For thirty-eight years, Lyman Bounous enhanced the lives of hundreds-plus PSJA students by teaching
them English, poetry, writing skills, authors, and grammar. He spent countless hours carefully grading
research papers in such a way that each student benefited from his personalized and detailed corrections. A
bulletin board in his room displayed the names of every student who dared to use a “double negative,” a
mistake they would never repeat. His students remember Mr. Bounous as a man of wit, wisdom, and
compassion, but most of all as a Master teacher whose patience taught them respect.

Born December 16, 1941 in Springfield, Missouri, Lyman spent his formative years on his grandparents’
farm, Whitewood, located in the beautiful Ozarks. While his father was serving overseas during WWII and
again during the Korean Conflict, the rest of the Bounous Family resided at Whitewood. During these
years, Lyman’s grandfather taught him to hunt, fish, bale hay, and milk cows. It was here where Lyman
developed a love of fishing that would sustain him the rest of his life. In testament to that fact, almost every
guest at his retirement party gave him a gift card to Academy.

When Lyman’s father, Dr. Lyle Bounous, was offered a teaching position at Pan American College (now,
UTRGV), the family packed up, left Missouri and moved to Edinburg, Texas. During his teen years,
Lyman would take the train from Brownsville back to Missouri where he spent summers working on the
farm and fishing with his Grandpa. After graduating from Edinburg High School and Pan American
College, Lyman enlisted in the US Army Reserve and six years later was honorably discharged as a Spec 4
in Heavy Weapons Infantry. Soon after, he attended Texas A&I (now TAMU) in Kingsville where he
earned a Master’s in English. He read the Classics, interpreted poetry, and spent time attempting to write
classical music. Although he could play the piano, he could not play the music he wrote, so his classical
pianist trained mother would play his music while he listened intently being quick to call out a note
sounding sharp or flat. He applied to and was hired by PSJA ISD at a time when he was only a few years
older than most of his students. During his tenure at PSJA, he met and married a teacher, Julie Duran
Bounous. For the remainder of their professional lives, they rode to and from work together and shared
lunch together in their classrooms, which were side by side. And, this is how they would spend their thirty-
five year marriage, side by side.

Not a man of many words, Lyman did enjoy describing the nuances of a fine wine while longing for
nothing more than a cold beer. On other occasions, he would pop his collar, pausing to quote the poetry of
Edgar Allen Poe while listening to Motzart and elaborating upon the composer’s writing. He probably
would not have approved of the grammar in that last sentence, but it is true nonetheless. He often spent
hours pouring over his topographical maps and planning camping trips with his life long PSJA buddies
Paul Denman, Bob Soper, and Donna Grimes. He took joy in late summer monitoring the Whitewing
migration (you should see his copious notes), and on any given day, he could report the CSF (cubic square
feet) of any river in Texas. But, fishing from his kayak at La Joya Lake was something that always
nourished his soul. When he wasn’t fishing, he enjoyed being home with a cat in his lap and timing himself
as he completed a difficult crossword puzzle. In fact, he kept meticulous notes proving he finished each
puzzle in record time. One of his proudest accomplishments was earning the title, “North Am Champ”,
which his nephews gave to him based upon his legendary wins during their annual Yahtzee tournaments.
As much as he loved and appreciated the simple things in life, family, music, literature, and nature.

NOTHING gave him greater joy than being the #1 Fan of the Missouri (MIZZOU) Tigers. During football
and basketball seasons, Lyman could be found glued to the Internet researching the histories and stats of
every coach and every player who ever wore the black and gold. Just about the only things that could get
his attention when Mizzou was on the field were his precious grandchildren, Emily, Logan, Avery, and
Pierce. Even during his last days fighting cancer, Lyman’s arms were always open when one of them
needed a hug, a lap to sit in and a book to be read to them, side by side, just as he lived life with his beloved
Julie.

Lyman was predeceased by his parents, Dr. Lyle and Madeline Bounous and sister, Colette Bounous Wetli.

Left to be grateful for the life of an exceptionally good man, are his wife Julie  son Bryan Bounous of McAllen, daughters Janine (Michael) Clifford of McAllen, Elise (Peter Gill) Bounous of San Antonio,
Grandchildren, Emily, Logan, and Avery Clifford and Pierce Gill, sister Yvonne (Johnny) Kautsch of
Alamo, sister-in-law Imelda Flores of Edinburg, brother-in-law Ponce (Mary) Duran II of Dallas, nephews
Mark May of McAllen, Damon and Lance Wetli of Greenville,SC, Brent Wetli of Thousand Oaks, CA,
Jaime Duran and Jacob Flores of Edinburg, Ponce Duran III of Dallas, nieces Yvette Wetli Rossback of
Escondido, CA, Linda Duran of Dallas, and cousin, Bronwyn Bounous of Chico, CA.

The Family would like to thank Amara Hospice for their devoted care of Lyman.

A memorial service celebrating Lyman’s life will be held Wednesday, September 11,2019 at Legacy Chapels, 4610 S. Jackson rd. Edinburg, Tx from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. with a 6 p.m. prayer service.

 In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Amara Hospice in McAllen.